New Hubble views of earliest galaxies

The largest sample yet of the faintest and earliest known galaxies in the universe, revealed by Hubble. Some formed just 600 million years after the Big Bang.

This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1–2403. This is one of six being studied by the Hubble Frontier Fields programme, which together have produced the deepest images of gravitational lensing ever made. Due to the huge mass of the cluster it is bending the light of background objects, acting as a magnifying lens. Astronomers used this and two other clusters to find galaxies which existed only 600 to 900 million years after the Big Bang.
View larger. | The galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1–2403. It’s being studied by the Hubble Frontier Fields program. Due to the huge mass of the cluster it is bending the light of background objects, acting as a gravitational lens. Astronomers used this and two other clusters to find galaxies which existed only 600 to 900 million years after the Big Bang.
If we could look far enough away in space – and therefore far enough back in time – could we see the beginnings of the universe? The answer is surely yes, and now the Hubble Space Telescope has looked over 12 billion light-years away, and thus that far back in time, to create the largest sample yet of the faintest and earliest known galaxies in our universe. A technique called gravitational lensing revealed these galaxies, which existed at a time when our universe was very young. A Hubble website said this week (October 22, 2015) that some of these galaxies formed just 600 million years after the Big Bang.

http://earthsky.org/space/new-hubble-views-earliest-galaxies-october-2015-frontier-fields

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